People

Nadi Abusaada
Postdoc

Nadi Abusaada

Postdoc
abusaada@arch.ethz.ch

Dr. Nadi Abusaada is an architect and a historian. He is currently ETH Zürich Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for the History and Theory of Architecture (GTA) at the Department of Architecture, ETH Zürich. He is a member of the Chair of the History and Theory of Urban Design led by Prof. Dr. Tom Avermaete.

Before moving to Zürich, Nadi was an Aga Khan Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Architecture + Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Nadi completed his Ph.D. and M.Phil. degrees at the University of Cambridge and his B.A. (Hons) at the University of Toronto.

Nadi is also the co-founder of Arab Urbanism, a global network dedicated to historical and contemporary urban issues in the Arab region. His writings have been featured in a number of international publications including The Architectural Review, The International Journal of Islamic Architecture, and the Jerusalem Quarterly among others.

Tom Avermaete
Professor

Tom Avermaete

Professor
tom.avermaete@gta.arch.ethz.ch

After his architecture studies in Belgium and Denmark, Tom Avermaete (b.1971, Antwerp) obtained an MSc degree and a PhD in the history and theory of architecture at the University of Leuven, Belgium. Avermaete was lecturer in the history of architecture at the University of Copenhagen (1997), leader of the Centre for Flemish Architectural Archives at the Flemish Architecture Institute (2003), as well as associate professor (2006) and full professor of architecture (2012) at Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.

Tom Avermaete has held several visiting professorships, amongst others at the Politecnico di Milano, Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Tokyo Institute of Technology and the University of Copenhagen. He is on the editorial board of the “OASE Journal for Architecture”, and previously of the “Journal of Architectural Education” (JAE, until 2015) and of the “Architecture in the Netherlands Yearbook” (2012-2016).

Avermaete is a member of the advisory board of the “Architectural Theory Review” and “Docomomo Journal”, and a co-editor of the series “Bloomsbury Studies in Modern Architecture” (with Janina Gosseye, Bloomsbury Academic). He is a member of the scientific board of the Jaap Bakema Centre (HNI, Rotterdam), the programme committee of the Berlage Centre for Advanced Studies in Architecture and Urban Design, and of the Global Architectural History Teaching Collaborative (GAHTC).

Courses

A Global History of Urban Design I
A Global History of Urban Design II

Research

The Work of Michel Ecochard

Annamaria Bonzanigo
Junior research assistant

Annamaria Bonzanigo

Junior research assistant
abonzanigo@arch.ethz.ch

Annamaria Bonzanigo completed her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Architecture at ETH Zürich, graduating in 2022 with supervision from Prof. H. Klumpner (D-ARCH) and Prof. D. Kaufmann (D-BAUG). She gained practical experience during internships at Burkhalter Sumi Architekten and Lehmag AG. Bonzanigo is fluent in written and spoken English, Italian, French, Spanish, German, and Portuguese. In 2019, her fascination for languages and cultures led her to spend six months at CEPT University in Ahmedabad (IN) as part of an exchange semester. There she discovered her strong interest in the tensions between Northern and Southern hemisphere building processes. In March 2022, she started a collective with three colleagues that focuses on organizing participative building sites with rammed earth for young professionals. 

She joined the chair of History and Theory of Urban Design (Prof. Tom Avermaete),gta, ETH Zürich, in Autumn 2021 as a student assistant, where she supported Dr. Cathelijne Nuijsink with varied tasks, such as the building up of the physical exhibition and the online archive of The Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition 1965-2017 research. Since Autumn 2022 she is working as a junior research assistant at the Chair of History and Theory of Urban Design and as a junior teaching assistant at the Chair of Architectural Behaviorology (Prof. Momoyo Kaijima), also at ETH Zürich. 

Thomas Chapman
Doctoral candidate

Thomas Chapman

Doctoral Candidate
chapman@arch.etchz.ch

Thomas Chapman was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1984. He has Master’s degrees in architecture (2008) and urban design (2013) from the University of the Witwatersrand, both which explored the reintroduction of publicness into the post-apartheid city. Before entering professional practice, Thomas worked as a researcher in the fields of oral history and civic engagement on the Sophiatown Project, a 5-year initiative funded by the South Africa-Netherlands Research Programme on Alternatives in Development (SANPAD).

Thomas founded the award-winning practice, Local Studio, in Johannesburg in 2012. The practice has a diverse portfolio of built work comprising public buildings, urban design schemes and multi-family housing and is responsible for several projects that have played a part in the regeneration of downtown Johannesburg.

Thomas was one of the Mail and Guardian Young South Africans in 2016 and was selected for the Columbia GSAPP’s ‘Constructing Practice’ symposium in 2017. Thomas was announced as one of Architectural Record’s ‘Vanguards’ in 2018, and was listed in the Wallpaper* Architects Directory in 2021.

Thomas has taught architecture and urban design at various institutions  and ran the affordable housing unit at the University of Johannesburg’s Graduate School of Architecture in 2018 and 2019. In 2022, Thomas commenced a full-time position as doctoral candidate at the Institute for the History and Theory of Architecture (gta), in the Chair of the History and Theory of Urban Design.

Publications

Chapman, Thomas. “Spatial justice and the Western Areas of Johannesburg”. African Studies, 74(1), pp.76-97. 2015.

Chapman, Thomas. and David Southwood. “Hustles: five years of Local Studio”. Johannesburg: Local Studio. 2018.

Chapman, Thomas. “The elusive 11 %: interrogating private-sector, affordable-rental housing in Johannesburg.” Graduate School of Architecture, University of Johannesburg. 2018.

Chapman, Thomas in Thelen, David. and Karie Morgan. (ed.) “Experiencing Sophiatown”. Johannesburg: Jacana. 2014.

Exhibitions

Counterspace and Michael Tymbios (co-curators). “Additions and Alterations- Recent Built Work by Local Studio in Johannesburg”. 4 – 28 Feb 2016, Exhibition at The Architect Gallery. Cape Town.

Presentations

Chapman, Thomas. “The Leftover City”. 6 Jul 2019, Kuala Lumpur Architecture Festival. Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre. Conference Presentation

Chapman, Thomas. “Greetings from Johannesburg”. 24 Apr 2019, Greetings From…Lecture Series. Recyclart, Brussels. Public Lecture

Chapman, Thomas. “Architecture as Social Enterprise”. 17 Nov 2017, Constructing Practice Symposium. Columbia GSAPP, New York. Conference Presentation

Chapman, Thomas. “Sophiatown: Making History and Crossing Boundaries in the New South Africa”. 14 Nov 2012, American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, San Francisco. Conference Presentation

Lahbib El Moumni
Doctoral candidate

Lahbib El Moumni

Doctoral candidate
elmoumni@gta.arch.ethz.ch

Lahbib El Moumni graduated in 2014 from the school of architecture in Casablanca (EAC), he then worked at OMA-Rem Koolhaas before getting back to his hometown to open his practice and teach at EAC. His interest in Modern Moroccan architecture started when he co-founded MAMMA (Mémoire des Architectes Moderns Marocains) in 2016, an association that highlights the modern heritage of Morocco between 1950 and 1980. He joined the Institute for History and Theory of Architecture at ETH Zurich in 2022 to start his research project on the postcolonial urban design of Africa between 1956 and 1975.

Publications:

El Moumni, Lahbib and Dahmani, Imad. Modern Casablanca Map, Postcolonial Architecture 1947-1980. MAMMA, 2019.

Research contributions:

Cecilia, Martinelli, Eliana, Mossa, Emilo, Heritage of Modern Architecture in Morocco. Quaderni 1 MINING CITIES. Fumagalli, 2020, pp. 41-46

El Moumni, Lahbib. “Brazil & Morocco – Déjà vu”, Dia a Dia magazine at 12a Bienal Internacional de Arquitetura de São Paulo, vol. 6, 2019.

Sara Frikech
Doctoral candidate

Sara Frikech

Doctoral candidate
frikech@arch.ethz.ch

Sara Frikech studied architecture at TU Delft and has practised as an architect at Shift A+U (Rotterdam) and at Korth Tielens (Amsterdam). She has shown her independent work at Le 18 (Marrakech), Salone del Mobile (Milan) and 2016 Marrakech Biennale. Her academic and artistic work has been supported by the Creative Industries Fund NL and a research fellowship from Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam. Her writing has been published in San Rocco Magazine and Trialog Journal. Currently, she is a doctoral fellow at the Institute of Landscape and Urban Studies (LUS), ETH Zurich. Her dissertation focuses on hydraulic infrastructures implemented in the city and hinterland of Meknes during the French protectorate (1912-1956).

Research

Tamed Waters

Angela Gigliotti
Academic guest

Angela Gigliotti

Academic guest
gigliotti@arch.ethz.ch

Angela Gigliotti (1986) graduated in Building Architecture at the Polytechnic University of Milan (B.Sc., M.Sc.), and, within a double degree program (Alta Scuola Politecnica; 2011), at the Polytechnic University of Turin (M.Sc.). She studied learning processes’ anthropology, pedagogy and psychology at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan, Italy (Pg.Cer.). Her Ph.D. thesis in Architecture (Aarhus School of Architecture; 2016-19), “The Labourification of Work: the contemporary modes of architectural production under the Danish Welfare State”, reconstructs the evolution of Danish architectural professionalism, exploring over several centuries the concepts of “labour” and “work” as approached in political theory.

She has served as educator/researcher at Polytechnic University of Milan (2010-13); NMBU University in Ås (Fall 2014; 2015); DIS Copenhagen (s. 2016); Architectural Association – School of Architecture in London (Spring 2018); MIUR – Italian Ministry of Education (Fall 2020; Spring 2021). She is author of chapters, articles and papers presented in various contexts. Recently, she co-edited the book “Utzonia: From/To Denmark with Love” (Trento: LIStLab Publisher 2020). She co-founded the research-based architectural practice OFFICE U67 ApS based in Aarhus, Denmark (s. 2013).

Currently, she is the HM Queen Margrethe II’s Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow awarded by Carlsberg Foundation (2021-23) at Det Danske Institut in Rome, Italy. Her PostDoc project “Unheard workers: behind a foreign diplomatic architecture of the 1960s in Rome” is affiliated with the ETH Zürich / gta – Chair of the History and Theory of Urban Design Professor Dr. Tom Avermaete and at the Arkitektskolen Aarhus, Denmark.

Research

Unheard Workers

Selected Publications

Gigliotti, Angela. expected 2022. ‘Being Friis and Moltke: the construction of a golden narrative.’ In Hans Ibelings and Boris Brorman Jensen. Provocations against perfectionism: The Architecture of Friis and Moltke: 1950-1980, pp. 211-220. Amsterdam/Montreal: The Architecture Observer.

Gigliotti, Angela and Fabio Gigone. 2021. ‘A return ticket to academia.’ In Drawings, edited by Alberto Calderoni, Carlo Gandolfi and Jacopo Leveratto. STOÀ: Strumenti per l’insegnamento della progettazione architettonica, Year I, Volume 2, pp. 76-91. Napoli: Thymos Books

Gigliotti, Angela. 2021. ‘The end of montagecirkulære: how the American dream “saved” Danish architectural profession.’ In The Global City: the urban condition as a pervasive phenomenon, edited by Marco Petrelli, Rosa Tamborino and Ines Tolic, Insights, Volume D, pp. 193-204. Torino: AISU International, Politecnico di Torino, DIST (Dipartimento Interateneo di Scienze, Progetto e Politiche del Territorio).

Gigliotti, Angela and Troels Rugbjerg. 2020. Utzonia: To/From Denmark with Love Trento: ListLab.

Gigliotti, Angela. 2020. ‘The Labourification of Work: The Contemporary Modes of Architectural Production under the Danish Welfare State.’ PhD Dissertation. Arkitektskolen Aarhus.

Gigliotti, Angela. 2020. The rise and the shortage of Danish-trained architects under Neo-Liberal Welfare State, AMPS Proceedings Journal Series, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp. 216-225.

Gigliotti, Angela. 2020. “Grounded Theory as method; Exhibition Design as mean” in Claus Peder Pedersen. CA2RE Aarhus, pp. 146-157. Aarhus: Arkitektskolens Forlag.

Gigliotti, Angela. 2020. Sweden as a knowledge exporter: the urgency of architectural efficiency under the Cold War in Christina Pech and Mikael Andersson. ArkDes Atlas, pp. 134-147. Stockholm: Arkdes Publisher.

Gigliotti, Angela. 2019. “Something is rotten in the State of Denmark” in Normal edited by Nicholas Korody and Joanna Kloppenburg, ED, Volume 3, pp. 57-61. Pasadena: Archinect.

Gigliotti, Angela. 2018. “Behind the scenes of the contemporary modes of architectural production” In Charlotte Bundgaard and Claus Peder Pedersen FORSK!, pp.30-31. Aarhus: Arkitektskolens Forlag.

Gigliotti, Angela. 2018. ‘The architectural practices and the Danish Welfare State: a changing open relationship’ in Walter Unterrainer ‘Emerging Architectures / The Changing Shape of Architectural Practices’, pp. 74-81. Aarhus: Arkitektskolens Forlag.

Sanna Kattenbeck
Doctoral candidate

Sanna Kattenbeck

Doctoral candidate
sanna.kattenbeck@gta.arch.ethz.ch

Sanna Kattenbeck, architect MSc, MAS ETH gta, studied architecture at the Brandenburg University of Technology and as a Jasso scholarship holder in the Momoyo Kaijima Studio at the Institute of Art and Design at the University of Tsukuba in Japan. After completing her Master’s degree, she worked in architectural offices in Lucerne and Zurich and graduated in autumn 2021 with a Master of Advanced Studies in the History and Theory of Architecture at the gta Institute of the ETH Zurich. As part of the MAS programme, she was actively involved in the exhibition project “Cooperative Conditions. A Primer on Architecture, Finance and Regulation in Zurich” for the Venice Architecture Biennale 2021 and contributed to the teaching of the MAS programme as a research assistant. In October 2021, Sanna started her Doctorate at the Chair of The History and Theory of Urban Design under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Tom Avermaete as part of the SNSF-funded project “Codes and Conventions for the Future of Zurich: A Propositional Planning Approach to Qualitative Densification“.

Research

Codes and conventions as implicit project for the city

 

Nicole de Lalouvière
Doctoral candidate

Nicole de Lalouvière

Doctoral candidate
lalouviere@arch.ethz.ch

Nicole de Lalouvière holds a liberal arts degree with concentrations in architectural history and geology from Colgate University (Hamilton, New York). In 2014, she graduated with a Master of Architecture from the University of British Columbia (Vancouver), where she received the thesis prize for her research and design work on possible futures for Diego Garcia (British Indian Ocean Territory). She has spent time studying art history in London and architecture at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen. She has practiced as an architect and landscape architect at MAD Architects (Beijing), PUBLIC (Vancouver), Hapa Collaborative (Vancouver), Vogt Landschaftsarchitekten (Zurich), and Baumschlager Eberle Architekten (Zurich). She is now doctoral fellow at the Institute of Landscape and Urban Studies (LUS), ETH Zurich. Her doctoral research is an investigation into the landscape and material history of the irrigation commons of Canton Valais, Switzerland.

Research
Irrigation Systems of Canton Valais: Transformations in Material Culture and the Resilience of Landscape Commons
Viral Balcony

Selected Publications

“Urban Landscape Transformations and the Malaria Control Scheme in Mauritius, 1948– 51.” Epidemic Urbanism: Contagious Diseases in Global Cities, edited by Mohammad Gharipour and Caitlin DeClercq, 2021, pp. 312–20.
https://www.intellectbooks.com/epidemic-urbanism

“Conceptualising ‘Cultural Landscape Commons’: Retracing Ecological Thinking from the Swiss Alpine Landscape to Social-Ecological Systems.” Journal of Alpine Research | Revue de géographie alpine, no. 109–1 (April 3, 2021).
https://doi.org/10.4000/rga.8414

“The Irrigation Systems of Valais: A Landscape Shaped by Care Work (Exhibition Display).” Zurich: Zurich Architektur Zentrum, 2021.

“The Five Wounds of Christ: Possible Futures for Diego Garcia.” The Site Magazine 37, no. Future Legacies (online edition) (December 5, 2017).
http://www.thesitemagazine.com/read/the-five-wounds-of-christ

“Fiction and Futures: Radical Alternatives for Diego Garcia”. Master’s thesis in Architecture, The University of British Columbia, 2014.

Co-authored publications:

Avermaete, Tom, Nicole de Lalouvière, Hamish Lonergan, Janina Gosseye, and Korinna Zinovia Weber. “The Viral Balcony: Or the Vicissitudes of an Urban Element in Times of Pandemic.” Gta Papers 5, no. Social Distance (2021).

Vogt, Günther and Nicole la Hausse de Lalouvière. “Search and Research: The Mols Landscape in Denmark”. In Your Glacial Expectations, edited by Studio Ólafur Elíasson, 147-170. London : Thames & Hudson, 2017.

Vogt, Günther, Nicola Eiffler, Nicole la Hausse de Lalouvière, Gijs Rijnbeek, and M.K. Smaby. Wunderlust, Wanderkammer. Zürich: Lars Müller Publishers, 2016. la Hausse de Lalouvière, Nicole.

Lalouvière, Nicole de, and Michael Taylor. “Urban Friends in Rural Places”. On Site Review vol. 27: Peripheral Urbanism (2012): 53-55.

Hamish Lonergan
Doctoral candidate

Hamish Lonergan

Doctoral candidate
hamish.lonergan@gta.arch.ethz.ch

Hamish Lonergan is an architect and doctoral student in the gta Institute at ETH Zurich, where he is part of the EU Horizon 2020 project ‘TACK / Communities of Tacit Knowledge: Architecture and its Ways of Knowing’. His contribution explores the social- and cultural-construction of the tacit dimension of architectural pedagogy today. His previous research has appeared in conferences and publications including Footprint, Inflection and OASE. Before joining the gta, he worked at COX Architecture (2018-2020) and curated the exhibition Bathroom Gossip (Brisbane, 2019). He graduated with a Master of Architecture from the University of Queensland in 2017 where his thesis, supervised by Prof. John Macarthur, analysed the popularity of Brutalism on social media through David Hume’s aesthetics.

Courses

Re-enacting Tacit Knowledge

Research

Viral Balcony
Teaching the Tacit
TACK

Selected Publications

Lonergan, Hamish. “The Royal National Theatre from Architectural Review to TikTok.” OASE no. 108, 2021, pp. 63-72.

Lonergan, Hamish. “Three Cities and a Village with Jan Morris.” Trans Magazin no. 39, 2021, pp. 9-14.

Lonergan, Hamish. “‘Crackpot’ and ‘Dangerous’: On the Authenticity of Miesian Reproductions.” Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand: 37, What If? What Next? Speculations on History’s Futures, Perth, edited by Kate Hislop and Hannah Lewi, SAHANZ, 2021, pp. 207-215.

Avermaete, Tom, Nicole de Lalouvière, Hamish Lonergan, Janina Gosseye, and Korinna Zinovia Weber. “The Viral Balcony: Or the Vicissitudes of an Urban Element in Times of Pandemic.” Gta Papers no. 5, Social Distance, 2021, 138-150.

Lonergan, Hamish. “Meme, Memory or Critic: Revaluing Brutalism on social media.” Valuing Architecture: Heritage and the Economics of Culture, edited by Ashley Paine, Susan Holden and John Macarthur, Valiz, 2020, pp. 212-226.
https://www.sahanz.net/wp-content/uploads/2A_207-215_LONERGAN.pdf.

Lonergan, Hamish. “Queer Stories, Off-Grid.” Cartha vol. 5, no. 2, 2020,
https://www.carthamagazine.com/issue/5-2/.

Lonergan, Hamish. “Pools, Carparks and Ball-Pits: Or why the Notre Dame restoration competition is a meme.’ Footprint no. 26, Spring / Summer 2020, pp. 125-136.
https://journals.open.tudelft.nl/footprint/article/view/4301.

Sebastiaan Loosen
Senior lecturer

Sebastiaan Loosen

Senior lecturer
sebastiaan.loosen@gta.arch.ethz.ch

Sebastiaan Loosen is senior lecturer and postdoctoral researcher at the Chair of the History and Theory of Urban Design. His postdoctoral research project, initiated at KTH Stockholm in 2020, aims to chart the role of architectural schools, centres and institutes in contributing to the 1960-80s agenda of ‘foreign aid’ by offering ‘South-oriented’ training programs in architecture, urbanism, and spatial planning.

After obtaining degrees in architectural engineering and in philosophy, he completed his doctoral dissertation, Shaping Social Commitment. Architecture and Intellectuality in the 1970s and ’80s, on the formative years of architectural theory in Belgium, investigating the various vantage points from which ‘the social’ was addressed in architectural thought (KU Leuven, 2019). Key themes that permeate his work are historiographical challenges, social commitment, and the intricacies of a globalizing architectural culture. On these themes, he recently co-edited for the EAHN’s open access journal Architectural Histories a Special Collection on ‘Marxism and Architectural Theory across the East-West Divide’ as well as an open access volume at Leuven University Press based on the international conference Theory’s History, 196X-199X. Challenges in the Historiography of Architectural Knowledge, held in Brussels, February 2017; and is currently co-editing a double theme issue of ABE Journal. Architecture Beyond Europe on ‘Architecture in the Foreign Aid-Funded Knowledge Economy’. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Architectural Histories and of gta papers.

Courses

Fachsemester – Material Commons (FS 2022)

Seminar Week – Material Circulation and the City: Belgium and Switzerland (FS 2022)

Selected Publications as Editor

Sebastiaan Loosen, Erik Sigge & Helena Mattsson, “Architecture in the Foreign Aid-Funded Knowledge Economy”, double theme issue of ABE Journal. Architecture Beyond Europe (forthcoming 2022-23).

Sebastiaan Loosen, Rajesh Heynickx & Hilde Heynen, The Figure of Knowledge. Conditioning Architectural Theory, 1960s-1990s (Leuven University Press, 2020).
doi:10.11116/9789461663221.

Hilde Heynen & Sebastiaan Loosen, “Marxism and Architectural Theory across the East-West Divide”, Special Collection of Architectural Histories 6-7 (2018-2019).
doi:10.5334/ah.401.

Selected Publications as Author

Sebastiaan Loosen, Viviana d’Auria & Hilde Heynen, “‘The City as a Housing Project’: Training for Human Settlements at the Leuven PGCHS in the 1970s-1980s”, in: Aggregate (ed.), Architecture in Development. Systems and the Emergence of the Global South (New York: Routledge, 2022), pp. 123-140.
doi:10.4324/9781003193654-9.

Sebastiaan Loosen, “The Challenge of the Poetic: Criticism in Search of the Real – with a Debt to bOb Van Reeth, 1975-1985”, CLARA Architecture/Recherche, no. 7: Critique architecturale et débat public, ed. by Hélène Jannière & Paolo Scrivano (2020), pp. 106-121.
doi:10.3917/clara.007.0106.

Sebastiaan Loosen, “Troubled Dialogues: Intellectuality at a Crossroads at the Carrefour de l’Europe in Brussels”, in: Loosen, Heynickx & Heynen (eds.), The Figure of Knowledge (2020, op. cit.), pp. 127-142.
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16x2c28.8.

Łukasz Stanek, interviewed by Hilde Heynen & Sebastiaan Loosen, “Cold War History beyond the Cold War Discourse: A Conversation with Łukasz Stanek”, Architectural Histories 7 (2019), art. 19, pp. 1-10.
doi:10.5334/ah.435.

Sebastiaan Loosen & Hilde Heynen, “Secularized Engagement in Architecture: Sieg Vlaeminck’s Plea for Woonecologie in 1970s Flanders”, International Journal for History, Culture and Modernity 6 (2018), pp. 1-37.
doi:10.18352/hcm.516.

Sebastiaan Loosen, “‘Le monopole du passéisme’: A Left-Historicist Critique of Late Capitalism in Brussels”, in: Ákos Moravánszky et al. (eds.), East West Central: Re-Building Europe, 1950-1990, vol. 3: Moravánszky & Torsten Lange (eds.), Re-framing Identities: Architecture’s Turn to History, 1970-1990 (Basel: Birkhäuser, 2016), pp. 261-274.
doi:10.1515/9783035608151-017.

Cathelijne Nuijsink
Senior lecturer

Cathelijne Nuijsink

Senior lecturer
cathelijne.nuijsink@gta.arch.ethz.ch

Cathelijne Nuijsink holds a BSc and MSc in Architecture from the Delft University of Technology, an MSc in Architecture from the University of Tokyo, and an MA from the University of Pennsylvania. In 2017, she completed a PhD in East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania, USA with the thesis entitled, What is a House?Architects Redesigning the Domestic Sphere in Contemporary Japan, 1995-2011.

Between 2018-2021, Nuijsink was a Horizon 2020-funded Marie Sklodowska-Curie postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute for the History and Theory of Architecture, where she conducted the research project, Architecture as a Cross-Cultural Exchange: The Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition, 1965-2017 [No. 797002]. Outcomes of the project include the exhibition, Call for Lost Entries: The Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition, 1965-2020, the online archive www.callforlostentries.com, and a monograph provisionally entitled, Another Historiography: The Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition, 1965-2020. 

In addition to her role as Senior Lecturer at ETH Zürich, during the academic year 2022–2023 Nuijsink is a Postgraduate Associate in The History, Theory and Criticism of Architecture and Art (HTC) program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as part of the SNSF-funded research project Unlocking the “Contact Zone”: Toward a New Historiography of Architecture.

Her current research engages with the development of new historiographic methods that enable histories of architecture in the latter half of the 20th century to be written in a way that is more inclusive, interdisciplinary, and polyvocal. In this capacity, she is leading the Methods research track of the Chair of the History and Theory of Urban Design.

Courses

The City in Theory – Her Agency (FS 2022)
The City Lived – Unlocking a Multidisciplinary Discourse (HS2021)
Fachsemester – Green Commons (FS 2021)
Fachsemester – Water Commons (HS 2021)
The City Represented – Visions of Urban Living (FS2020)
Summer School – The Architecture Competition as Cross-Cultural “Contact Zone” (FS2019)
Seminar Week – The Commons and the Modern Afropolis: Agadir and Casablanca (FS2019)

Research 

Unlocking the ‘Contact Zone’: Towards a New Historiography of Architecture
(Swiss National Science Foundation Fellowship)

Architecture as Cross-Cultural Exchange: The Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition 1965-2017
(Horizon 2020 Marie-Sklodowska Curie Fellowship)

Architects Negotiating Domesticity: Cross-Cultural Explorations of “House” and “Home”
(Benjamin Franklin Fellowship)

Selected Publications

Nuijsink, Cathelijne. “The Contact Zone of Agadir’s Emergency Operations.” Agadir: Building the Modern Afropolis. Eds. Tom Avermaete and Maxime Zaugg. Park Books, 2022. 69–84.

Nuijsink, Cathelijne. “Rem Koolhaas’ House with No Style: The 1992 Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition Forging a ‘Space of Ideas’.” The Hybrid Practitioner: Building, Teaching, Researching Architecture. Eds. Caroline Voet, Eireen Schreurs and Helen Thomas. KU Leuven Press, 2022. 249–60. 

Avermaete, Tom, and Cathelijne Nuijsink. “An Architecture Culture of ‘Contact Zones’: Prospects for an Alternative Historiography of Modernism.” Rethinking Global Modernism: Architectural Historiography and the Postcolonial. Eds. Vikramaditya Prakash, Maristella Casciato and Daniel E. Coslett. Routledge, 2022. 103–19.

Nuijsink, Cathelijne. “Negotiating Comfort in the Metropolis: Peter Cook, Toyo Ito and the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition, 1977 and 1988.” Abe Journal, vol. 10, no. 18, 2021.
http://doi.org/10.4000/abe.10444

Avermaete, Tom, and Cathelijne Nuijsink. “Architectural Contact Zones: Another Way to Write Global Histories of the Post-War Period?” Architectural Theory Review, vol. 25, no. 3, 2021: pp.350–61.
http://doi:10.1080/13264826.2021.1939745

Nuijsink, Cathelijne. “Multiple Authorship: The Collaborative Production of Knowledge in the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition (1965–2020).” Revista de Arquitectura, vol. 23, 2021: pp. 174–89.
https://doi.org/10.15581/014.23.174-189 

Nuijsink, Cathelijne, and Momoyo Kaijima. “Timber Behavoriology.” Architectural Theory Review, vol. 25, no. 1–2, 2021: pp. 136–51.
https://doi.org/10.1080/13264826.2021.1971832

Nuijsink, Cathelijne. “From ‘Container’ to ‘Lifestyle:’ Kazuyo Sejima, Sou Fujimoto and the Destruction of the Nuclear Family Box.” Interiors: Design/Architecture/Culture, vol. 11, no. 2/3, 2021: pp. 132–56.
https://doi.org/10.1080/20419112.2021.1943190

Nuijsink, Cathelijne. “A House for Everyone: Challenging the Post-war Myth of ‘The House for the Nuclear Family’ in Japan, 1954–2005.” Activism at Home: Architects Dwelling between Politics, Aesthetics and Resistance. Eds. Isabelle Doucet and Janina Gosseye. Jovis, 2021. 74–85.
https://doi.org/10.3929/ethz-b-000520064

Nuijsink, Cathelijne. “An Architects’ Response to Natural Disasters: Shared Living and Bottom-Up Community Building in Japan.” Nordic Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 33, no. 3, 2021: pp. 13–34.

Niloofar Rasooli
Doctoral candidate

Niloofar Rasooli

نیلوفر رسولی

Doctoral candidate
rasooli@arch.ethz.ch

Niloofar Rasooli joined the Institute for History and Theory of Architecture at ETH Zurich in 2021 as a doctorate fellow. Her research focuses on gendered spaces in late 19th century and 20th century Iran, and the spatial agency of women, servants, eunuchs, and other marginalized identities in the production of radical spaces.

Niloofar holds a master’s degree from the University of Tehran in Iranian Architecture Studies; she graduated in 2018 with the thesis entitled “An Introduction to Gender Studies in the Architecture of Iran: The Structure of Gendered Spaces in Qajar Aristocratic Houses of Tehran.”

Previously, Niloofar worked as a journalist at Etemad Daily (2019-2021), where she covered the subjects of Women and Inequity with a particular interest in the status of women in architecture, the first generation of women architects in Iran, spatial marginality, and the lives and rights of women of Afghanistan living in Iran. Her series of reports on the legal conflict of claiming citizenship for the children of Iranian women marrying other nationalities won the first prize in the In-Equality Reports of the Ministry of Cooperatives, Labor and Social Welfare of Iran (2020).

In addition to her journalistic work, Niloofar has contributed as a guest editor, writer, and translator to Abadi (the journal of Iranian Urban Planning and Architecture Studies and Research Center), Hamshahri-e-Memari (Architectural Journal of the Municipality of Tehran), and Koubeh (a student-run online journal of architecture in Iran). She has recently edited a special issue of Koubeh on Space, Gender, and Power.

Selected publications

“Our Land, Their Torkamānchāy: A Report on the Conflict of the Land Acquisition in the Development Plan of the University of Tehran.” Abadi Journal, vol. 27, no. 85–86, 2021, pp. 198–209.

Rasooli, Niloofar, and Saeid Khaghani. “The Women Architects of Iran: Their Practice and Influence (1940-1976).” Women’s Creativity since the Modern Movement: Toward a New Perception and Reception Ed. by Helena Seražin, Caterina Franchini and Emilia Garda, 2018, pp. 319–24.

Hans Teerds
Senior lecturer

Hans Teerds

Senior lecturer
hans.teerds@gta.arch.ethz.ch

Hans Teerds (b.1976, Zwijndrecht, The Netherlands) studied architecture and urban design at the Faculty of Architecture of the Delft University of Technology. After his studies, in 2003 he was invited to join the “Meesterproef,” a young-talent program of the Dutch and Flemish state architects. He established his design practice in Amsterdam (2004–2014), working on a range of urban and architectural projects, including for the entry pavilion of the cemetery of Blankenberge (B). Simultaneously he started to develop a research project at the Delft University of Technology, exploring the issue of public space and the political context of architecture and cities as approached through the writings of the philosopher Hannah Arendt. In the Fall of 2009, he was made a research fellow at the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson (NY) in order to prepare a dissertation on this topic. He defended his dissertation “At Home in the World: Architecture, the Public, and the Writings of Hannah Arendt,” in 2017 at the Delft University of Technology.

Besides his research, he has taught theory and design courses at the Delft University of Technology, mainly focusing on issues regarding architecture, cities, and public spaces. He also lectured on these issues and has been a visiting critic at several schools in Europe and North America, including the AA, Bard College, the Berlage Institute, Ghent University, KU Leuven, Pratt Institute, FAUUSP, University of Toronto, and Pratt Institute. Teerds publishes frequently on architecture, urbanism, and landscape in a range of different media. He is member of the editorial board of the architectural magazine “OASE Journal for Architecture.” He co-edited the anthology “Architectural Positions: Architecture, Modernity and the Public Sphere” (2009, together with Tom Avermaete and Klaske Havik), and is author of “Levend Landschap: Manifest voor stad en land” (2012, together with Johan van der Zwart) and of “Architectuur. Werk in uitvoering” (2018).

Courses

Fundamentals of the History and Theory of Architecture I+II
History and Theory of Architecture IX
Zurich Commons
The City Lived (Politics of Urban Design)
The City in Theory (Capital, X & Public Space)
The City in Theory (Smart Cities & Public Space)
The City in Theory (Gentrification & Public Space)

Exhibitions

The Commons and the Production of Everyday Life
SESC Stories A Social Archive

Selected Publications

Teerds, Hans (2022), ‘It’s a Smart World? An Architectural Reflection on Smart Cities through Hannah Arendt’s Notion of the World’, in: Arendt Studies.
https://doi.org/10.5840/arendtstudies202263047

Teerds, Hans (2022), ‘Contested Privacy and the Challenge of the Public Sphere in the Age of Surveillance’, in: Critical Studies in Media Communications.
https://doi.org/10.1080/15295036.2022.2090736

Teerds, Hans (2022), ‘And What about Architecture?’ In: Désirée van Hoek, Notes on Downtown. Los Angels 2007-2022. Amsterdam, Désirée van Hoek

Avermaete, Tom, Grafe, Christoph, Patteeuw, Véronique, and Teerds, Hans (eds.) (2021), Modernities. OASE#109. Rotterdam, Uitgeverij nai010

Teerds, Hans. (2020). ‘The World and the Cave. Imagination, Public Space, and Politics with Hannah Arendt and Jose Saramago,’ Writing Place #4, Choices and Strategies of Spatial Imagination (Klaske Havik, Rajesh Heynickx, and Angeliki Sioli (eds.)), Rotterdam, nai010 Publishers, 2020. https://doi.org/10.7480/writingplace.4.5274

Teerds, Hans. (2020). ‘Designing a Common World: Public Responsibility and the Aim to Objectify Architecture’, in: Architecture Philosophy, Volume 5, Issue 1. https://ojs.library.okstate.edu/osu/index.php/jispa/article/view/8031

Teerds, Hans. (2020). ‘Passionate Engagement with the Things of the World: Hannah Arendt as Interlocutor in the Writings of George Baird’, in: Roberto Damiani (ed.), The Architect and The Public: On George Baird’s Contribution to Architecture, Macerata, Quodlibet.

Teerds, Hans; Grafe, Christoph; and Koekoek, Catherine (eds) (2020). Table Settings. Reflections on Architecture with Hannah Arendt, Rotterdam, nai010 Publishers.
https://www.oasejournal.nl/en/Issues/106

Teerds, Hans. (2018). ‘Vita Architectura. Architecture, Craftsmanship and the Public World,’ in: Craft – the Art of Making Architecture. Dialectic VI, The Journal of the School of Architecture, University of Utah, Salt Lake City/San Francisco, Oro Editions.
https://www.dialecticjournal.org/volume-6#TeerdsVita

Teerds, Hans. (2016). ‘Within or Without the Four Walls. An Architectural Reading of Hannah Arendt’s Reflections on the Private Realm,’ in: HA, The Journal of the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College, Volume 4.

Teerds, Hans. (2016). ‘Lebensraum: Notes on Hannah Arendt and the Private Realm’, in: DASH 11, Interiors on Display, Rotterdam 2016, nai010 Publishers.

Teerds, Hans. (2015). ‘Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, and the Importance of the Interior’, in: HA, The Journal of the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College, Volume 3.

Teerds, Hans. (2014). ‘Constructing Culture. A Political Perspective’, in: Architecture and Culture, Volume 2, Issue 2. https://doi.org/10.2752/205078214X14030008752542

Laura Trazic
Scientific assistant

Laura Trazic

Scientific assistant
trazic@arch.ethz.ch

Dr. Laura Trazic studied architecture at the ENSA Marseille with a semester abroad at the ETSA Sevilla. After her Master degree she worked for two years in various architectural offices and then joined the Doctoral Program Architecture and Sciences of the City at EPFL. In 2021, she completed her doctoral research on Eighteenth and Nineteenth centuries aesthetics, in which she traced the genealogy of a theory of composition by shadows influenced by painting theory, through both iconographic and semantic mediums (“De la décoration par les ombres: traduction de méthodes picturales dans l’architecture française des XVIIIème et XIXème siècles”). For this research, she was partially funded by the Swiss Government Excellence Scholarships for Foreign Students and was awarded the 2021 Distinction Prize of the EPFL Doctoral Program “Architecture and Sciences of the City”. In parallel, she took part in the teaching activities of the Arts of Sciences Laboratory (LAPIS) led by Prof. Nicola Braghieri. Since spring 2021, she is project manager at the chair of Prof. Tom Avermaete for the European research project “Communities of Tacit Knowledge: Architecture and its Ways of Knowing”.

Korinna Zinovia Weber
Scientific assistant

Korinna Zinovia Weber

Scientific assistant
korinna.weber@arch.ethz.ch

Dr. Korinna Zinovia Weber studied architecture at the TU Munich with a year abroad at the ENSA-Paris-La-Villette. She was awarded in the ICCC Student Design Competition (3rd groupe prize) in 2014 and presented her project for social integrity at the UN in New York and Beijing. After her Master degree she completed her doctoral research at the EPFL on rehabilitation strategies for post-war social housing (Les “vestiges” de l’opération Million dans l’oeuvre de Georges Candilis – Actualités et Strategies de sauvegarde pour un patrimoine du second après-guerre), financed by the excellence scholarship of the Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes. She presented her research project at various conferences e.g. in Zagreb and Athens and was awarded the Theodor-Fischer-Preis in 2022. Since 2019 she has become project manager at the chair of Prof. Tom Avermaete and assistant lecturer at the chair of Prof. Markus Peter at ETHZ.

Selected Publications

Weber, Korinna. (2017). ‘Georges Candilis – Architect, Urban Planer and Author with communist ideas in a capitalist world’, French Culture and Central East European Modern Art, Zagreb.

Weber, Korinna. (2019). ‘Les ‘vestiges’ de l’opération Million dans l’oeuvre de Georges Candilis – Actualités et stratégies de sauvegarde pour un patrimoine de l’habitat économique du second-après guerre’, EPFL.
https://infoscience.epfl.ch/record/268036

Weber, Korinna; Margarita Agriantoni. (2021). ‘(Weight)lifting the Olympic Heritage – The “White Elephants” of Athens 2004‘, Hefte des deutschen Nationalkommitees LXXVI von ICOMOS, Berlin.

Maxime Zaugg
Doctoral candidate

Maxime Zaugg

Doctoral candidate
maxime.zaugg@gta.arch.ethz.ch

Maxime Zaugg obtained his master’s degree in architecture at the ETH Zurich and is currently Ph.D. candidate at the Chair of the History and Theory of Urban Design, gta, ETH Zurich under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Tom Avermaete. His project entitled “Exploring Urban Models” examines how strong performative and participative capacities have enabled urban scale models to play a key role in urban planning, focusing particularly on the period from the late 1960s to the early 1990s. Maxime Zaugg founded the practice STUDIO (2017) which mediates between architecture and the city applying different media and tools and contributes to competitions, urban research, workshops, and realizations. He has published his research in journals such as the gta Papers and attended various international conferences.

Courses

Fachsemester – Material Commons (FS 2022)

Fachsemester – Housing Commons (HS 2021)

Fachsemester – Green Commons (FS 2021)

Fachsemester – Water Commons (HS 2020)

Seminar Week – Housing Cooperatives (HS 20219)

Fundamentals of the History and Theory of Architecture I+II

Selected Publications

DU Magazin 910 | December/January 2021/22, Städtebau, Die Rückkehr des grossen Plans, ISBN:978-3-907315-09-5, Edited by Prof. Dr. Tom Avermaete. Luca Can und Maxime Zaugg, Die Werkzeuge einer neuen Wirklichkeit.

GTA PAPERS issue no. 4 (2021): THE CORNICE / DAS GESIMS; Le Corbusier and the Cornice. Maxime Zaugg, 2021

GTA PAPERS special edition: Social Distance, Spatial specificities of the balcony: between exposure &enclosure. In Collaboration with the Chair of the History and Theory of Urban Design. Collaborative Article. 2021

Conferences

‘Stadtplanung geht uns alle an’ (urban planning concerns us all) and Berlin’s Vitrinen from 1957-1960 at the SAH 2022 Annual International Conferenc, April 27–May 1 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Projet Urbain of Euralille : Urban Scale Models and the Public, Conference ‘Histories of Urban Design: Global Trajectories and Local Realities’ 15-17 November 2021, ETH Zurich

“The Emergence of Urban Design and the Public Agency of the Maquette“. Society of Architectural Historians SAH 2021 Annual Conference. 14-18 April 2021.

Research

Exploring Urban Scale Models: The Projets Urbains and the Performance of the “Maquette”, 1960s – 1990s

Teaching assistants

  • Luca Can
  • Maria Margherita Innocenti
  • Chiara De Libero
  • Rico Muth
  • Martin Roesch
  • Leandra Graf
  • Sereina Fritsche
  • Pierre Eichener
  • Melanie Kofler

Former members

  • Dr. Fatina Abreek-Zubiedat
  • Dr. Irina Davidovici
  • Dr. Janina Gosseye
  • Dr. Marianna Charitonidou
  • Maaike Goedkoop
  • Dr. Ruth Hanisch
  • Léa-Catherine Szacka