Call for Lost Entries: The Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition, 1965-2020

An exhibition that explores a long-running ideas competition from Japan that initiated radical ideas on housing in the form of entries received from across the world.

ETH Zurich. HIL Foyer, from November 3 to December 10 2021.

The exhibition ‘Call for Lost Entries: The Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition, 1965-2020’, curated by Cathelijne Nuijsink aims to start a discussion on the effects of incomplete archives on architectural research and to appeal for greater diversity and inclusivity as well as multiple authorship in architectural historiography.

1965
Theme: Home for a White-Collar Worker
Judge: Kiyoshi Seike
The competition attracted 407 entries, of which
398 are missing today.

1966
Urban residences and their connective systems
/ Residence for an average urban family
Judge: K. Tange

The competition attracted 328 entries, of which
318 are missing today.

1967
Urban residences for an high-density society
Judge: U. Nishiyama

The competition attracted 100 entries, of which
85 are missing today.

1968
A residential group for six households
Judge: J. Yoshimura

The competition attracted most entries than ever before, of which
12 have been published.

1969
Faculty housing in a university village
Judge: T. Yoshizaka

The competition attracted 305 entries, of which
293 are missing today.

1970
Investigate the Nature of a House as a Life-Production Vessel
Judges: N. Kawazoe, K. Kikutake, F. Maki

The competition attracted 139 entries, of which
125 are missing today.

1971
No competition

1972
The Home
Judge: K. Shinohara

The competition attracted 356 entries, of which
345 are missing today.

1973
Family Housing Harmonized with Natural Greenery
Judge: F. Nishizawa

The competition attracted 206 entries, of which
196 are missing today.

1974
Urban, Low-Rise, Group Dwellings
Judge: Y. Ashihara, M. Tominaga

The competition attracted 460 entries, of which
448 are missing today.

1975
House for a superstar
Judge: A. Isozaki

The competition attracted 348 entries, of which
338 are missing today

1976
A house for an Intersection
Judge: R. Meier

The competition attracted 427 entries, of which
401 are missing today.

1977
Comfort in the Metropolis
Judge: P. Cook

The competition attracted 446 entries, of which
399 are missing today.

1978
Machiya as Muko Sangen Ryodonari
Judge: C. W. Moore

The competition attracted 747 entries, of which
725 are missing today.

1979
A house for Karl Friedrich Schinkel
Judge: J. Stirling

The competition attracted 384 entries, of which
364 are missing today.

1980
A house at the juncture of history and now
Judge: K. Kurokawa

The competition attracted 253 entries, of which
237 are missing today.

1981
An Exhibition House on the Grounds of a Museum of the 20th Century
Judge: F. Maki

The competition attracted 561 entries, of which
541 are missing today.

1982
No competition

1983
A Dwelling with Historicism and Localism
Judges: Y. Ashihara, M. Otaka, A. Shimokobe, C. Correa and M. Graves

The competition attracted 370 entries, of which
348 are missing today.

1984
A style for the year 2001
Judges: F. Maki, H. Hara, A. Rossi

The competition attracted 403 entries, of which
373 are missing today.

1985
Bulwark of Resistance
Judge: T. Ando

The competition attracted 378 entries, of which
358 are missing today.

1986
300/300/300
Judge: H. Jahn

The competition attracted 207 entries, of which
192 are missing today.

1987
The Japanese House Today
Judge: M. Miyawaki

The competition attracted 207 entries, of which
187 are missing today.

1988
Comfort in the Metropolis
Judge: T. Ito

The competition attracted 373 entries, of which
353 are missing today.

1989
Disprogramming
Judge: B. Tschumi

The competition attracted 201 entries, of which
180 are missing today.

1990
The House is an Electronics Device for Living in
Judge: H. Hara

The competition attracted 217 entries, of which
195 are missing today.

1991
Another Glass House
Judges: P. Johnson & T. Ando

The competition attracted 602 entries, of which
181 are missing today.

1992
House with NO STYLE
Judge: R. Koolhaas

The competition attracted 732 entries, of which
716 are missing today.

1993
Basic Shelter and Your Local Memory, for Living
Judge: R. Piano

The competition attracted 380 entries, 766 of
which are missing today.

1994
Urban Dwelling
Judge: F. Maki

The competition attracted 284 entries, 272 of
which are missing today.

1995
Simplicity/Complexity
Judge: J. Nouvel

The competition attracted 343 entries, 311 of
which are missing today.

1996
The Possibilities of Non-Movement.
Judge: K. Sejima

The competition attracted 436 entries, 424 of
which are missing today.

1997
House of Collaboration
Judge: J. Herzog

The competition attracted 386 entries, 374 of
which are missing today.

1998
A house as a poetic space
Judge: S. Takamatsu

The competition attracted 480 entries, 367 of
which are missing today.

1999
A Theater for 200 people built in the arena of urban center
Judge: O. Niemeyer

The competition attracted 351 entries, 347 of
which are missing today.

2000
Final House
Judge: T. Ito

The competition attracted 267 entries, 254 of
which are missing today.

2001
The Surrounded House
Judge: W. Maas

The competition attracted 177 entries, 155 of
which are missing today.

2002
Dwelling where the Muses are served/spared emptiness
Judge: D. Liebeskind

The competition attracted 293 entries, 285 of
which are missing today.

2003
Architecture Virus
Judge: K. Sakamura

The competition attracted 209 entries, 198 of
which are missing today.

2004
House of Multiple Dimensions
Judge: S. Holl

The competition attracted 523 entries, 511 of
which are missing today.

2005
Action for Sustainability
Judges: T. Ando + R. Rogers

The competition attracted 465 entries, 452 of
which are missing today.

2006
The Plan-less House
Judge: K. Kuma

The competition attracted 595 entries, 587 of
which are missing today.

2007
A House with Resale Value
Judge: K
. Kojima
The competition attracted 176 entries, 166 of
which are missing today.

2008
Four square House design problem – Homage to John Hejduk
Judge: R. Moneo

The competition attracted 593 entries, 584 of
which are missing today.

2009
The Residence – From our having lived the Movie Century
Judge: Jun Aoki

The competition attracted 312 entries, 303 of
which are missing today.

2010
A New Spirit
Judge: Ryue Nishizawa

The competition attracted 779 entries, 769 of
which are missing today.

2011-2016
No Competitions

2017
House of Dimensions
Judge: G
. Hasegawa
The competition attracted 418 entries, 408 of
which are missing today.

2018
AI House
Judge: S. Shigematsu

The competition attracted 238 entries, 233 of
which are missing today.

2019
Living in the Future
Judges: N. Tehrani, M. Lee, L. Iwamoto, B. Bestor, Ch. Parreño Alonso

The competition attracted 335 entries, 327 of
which are missing today.

2020
Sustainability and Urbanism – Housing and Life in the Future
Judge: Ch. Ingenhoven

The competition attracted 244 entries, 238 of
which are missing today.

Timeline

This timeline visualizes the enormous investment of energy and ingenuity put into the 48 editions of the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition over a period of 55 years. The exhibition shows the density of applications in relation to each edition’s judge and competition theme, as well as the prize winners and honorable mentions whose competition entries are preserved in the pages of The Japan Architect and Shinkenchiku magazine. The timeline also raises awareness of the vast number of entries that have been lost but are considered crucial in making the history of the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition more global and inclusive. The exhibition asks, what would that history look like if all the contestants of the “blank entries” came forward and re-submitted their work?

Competition Briefs

Unlike the “mediated” briefs that result when a team of organizers or jury members jointly decide on one theme, the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition allows the single judge to choose a competition theme, thereby consciously and even provocatively generating international architectural debate. The 48 competition briefs collected here invite you to find links with the overall trends and tendencies in the global housing debate, to dive into a single competition theme and situate that in a particular context, and to find links between the different competition editions across time.

Competition Entries

The selection of a single master architect as judge and jury—a unique component of this competition—suggests the grand narrative of a heroic architect claiming sole authorship. This exhibition argues just the opposite. While renowned architects as adjudicators have certainly helped the competition succeed, what makes this competition worthwhile as an object of study is the cultural diversity of the entries, and the resultant dialogue between the judge and contestants that plays out on the pages of Shinkenchiku and The Japan Architect. The selection of multiple winners so emblematic of this competition demonstrates that the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition was set up from the start as a platform for discussion rather than a search for a single right answer. Pick up copies of the competition entries for yourself and discover the plurality of multicultural responses that contributed to the wider discussion initiated by the judge.

Archive in the Making

Over 17,000 teams of designers from across the world participated in the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition between 1965 and 2020, but only those entries that made it into the pages of The Japan Architect and Shinkenchiku magazine are preserved. To make the history of the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition more complete, this exhibition calls on all designers who have participated in this competition to re-submit their competition entry and so ensure their voice is included in the history of the competition. To collect the lost competition entries, The Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition ARCHIVE, an openly accessible online archive was created. Did you ever participate in the Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition? Help us build an archive by submitting your entry at callforlostentries.com

© Studio Joost Grootens
© Studio Joost Grootens

Call for lost Entries

The research for this exhibition received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement 797002, “Architecture as a Cross-Cultural Exchange: The Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition, 1965–2017.”

The exhibition was supported by the Creative Industries Fund NL, the Chair of the History and Theory of Urban Design, ETH Zürich and an ETH Career Seed Grant.

Graphic Design: Studio Joost Grootens, Web Development: F451,
Content Management: Annamaria Bonzanigo

Special Thanks to
Grégoire Bridel, Mathis Pante, Ling Xu, Luca Can, Friederike Merkel, students in the ETH Zürich seminar The City Represented – Visions of Urban Living (Spring 2020), and participants in the international ETH Zürich summer school Visualizing the Architecture Competition as Contact Zone (Summer 2019).

Contact: Cathelijne Nuijsink